Mermaid wisdom

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mermaid wisdom
By studying merfolk and their sea-home, we can learn how nature creates her power. We need to make use of this information because we are running out of fuel and we are killing off the land and sea to create more power. Mother Earth and the Sea-Mother Goddess produce power without burning or destroying — by using the very process of life itself. This is the process of the vortex.

Natural motion comes from the power of the vortex. The vortex is clearly visible all around us — in whirlpools, thunderstorms, hurricanes, tornados, the solar system, galaxies — and in the simple movements of bees, fish, and dolphins. If we watch nature and copy her movements, we can have limitless, fuel-less power without pollution, without burning anything, and without destroying our planet and ourselves. The question is, “Do we have the wisdom to use this power?”

The poet Walt Whitman tells us that we come “out of the cradle endlessly rocking” — we come from the eternally rocking cradle of the sea, our Mother. Henry David Thoreau tells us that “there is more day to dawn. The sun is but a morning star.” In other words, we have much more to learn about life. Ralph Waldo Emerson tells us that “the ancient precept, ‘know thyself,’ and the modern precept, ‘study nature,’ become at last one maxim.” Thus, if we are to live long and prosper on the Earth, we must not only consider Mother Nature, but we must also learn from her.

To understand the secret of natural power, we have to understand that the way we live is not natural. We think life is all about ramming, pushing, shoving — like a brute beast blindly grunting away, struggling vainly to remove a rock that is in its way. In mythology, Sisyphus kept pushing that rock uphill in hell. But the rock always escaped and rolled back to where it started — leaving poor Sisyphus eternally frustrated. Sisyphus shows us the “quiet desperation” that Thoreau said we all experience — the frustration of life. And we say, “That’s life.” But the problem is not life — it is the way we look at life.

Consider how we look at the Great Pyramid. We wonder at the mental ability and muscular power needed to force those huge stones into position. We theorize that the Pyramid was build by extraterrestrials who had access to secret abilities and powers. But what if the Pyramid did not involve superhuman sweating and shoving? We marvel at the Pyramid, yet take the wisdom of the Nile River for granted. What is the Pyramid but a timepiece for the Nile? Our confusion about marvelous thing is understandable considering that the architectural wonder of our time is the skyscraper — not a marker pointing to the stars, not a calendar of the cyclic years, not a temple of wisdom — but a monument to commerce and business.

There is another way to create energy. This is the secret of the vortex. Ironically, the secret has always been right in front of us. Imagine if nature used power the way we do. Everything would be blown up, dried out — explosions and fire everywhere, struggling and seething. Life itself would be impossible. Instead, Mother Nature makes galaxies and orbits, wind and waves, thunder and trees — and, yes, even us.

In this way, it is natural to rediscover that innocence and wisdom in the merfolk and the sea. Forget everything you believe is real. Let your mind swim free in the ocean of life around you. Imagine that your body is made of stardust and sea-foam. Let yourself turn half way into a dolphin. Let yourself become a mermaid swimming free in the ocean. Notice how everything is alive, connected to everything else just like the pearls of a beautiful necklace. Everything in the universe is music — the vibrations that poets call the “music of the spheres.” Nothing is silent. Everything is conscious. This is how dolphins, whales, and merfolk experience life. This is vortex.

The vortex

When a solid object like a surfboard or airplane moves through water or air, the water or air molecules scrape, suck, and drag across the surface of the object. This friction slows movement. We would think that the smooth surface should slip through water or air. Yet the feathers of birds and scales of fish are relatively rough surfaces, but these creatures move more efficiently than man-made objects. The rough surface sets up a layer of turbulence along the surface which acts as a buffer zone between the air or water and the surface of the bird or fish. Within this zone, vortexes occur — tiny swirls and spirals that act like rollers or ball bearings allowing the bird or fish to slide through the air or water.

The simple bee offers an example of the vortex. Its body is too heavy for its small wings to lift, so it should be impossible for the bee to fly. Yet the bee flies! It does not use its wings to fight against the air in order to create lift. Its wings create a vacuum over the bee’s body. The bee simply floats up into the vacuum and then propels itself in whatever direction it wants to go.

Dolphins use tiny wrinkling muscles in their smooth skin to create the vortex layer that allows them to slide so effortlessly through the water. Merfolk use the same method of propulsion. If engineers would stop thinking in outworn ways about creating power, they could build far better, less wasteful machines!

If we can’t learn from Mother Nature, we’ll be out of the picture — extinct like dinosaurs. Our Mother turns millions and millions of tons of water every time the tide changes. She makes the water dance without burning a thing. That’s the magic of vortex. Using this energy, we could power cars, planes, and anything else creating energy the same way trees do — cleaning the air instead of poisoning it! But, would we use this power wisely? Perhaps not. Maybe that is why we haven’t learned to use it yet. But it is time to learn to use it — and use it wisely!

Song of the mermaid

The siren song invites us to make use of the vortex. But such power can both help and hurt us depending on how we use it. Like the ancient siren song of myth, the knowledge of vortex lures us to both ecstasy and destruction. It is our choice. The merfolk, fish, dolphins, and whales call us to be more wise in how we treat both land and sea. They sing to us, “As you are, we were. As we are, you can become.”



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